We’re changing the world of business

The University at Buffalo School of Management is a vibrant and inclusive community of big thinkers and even bigger doers. We work together to question and upend theories, lifting each other up and driving change. Because at the UB School of Management, ambition is a virtue, tenacity is a given, and discovery happens everywhere, from the classroom to the boardroom. That’s just how we do it here.

Eric Eynon, BS/MBA ’96, walks with his student mentee, Puja Shah, in the new Paula's Plaza outside the School of Management.

Paying it forward

Paying it forward
After more than a year of remote and hybrid learning, Panda Tran, BS ’22, connected with the school's accounting clubs to set up a program that connects students with industry mentors.

 

Woman frustrated at computer.

A return to the office could be bad for computer security

A return to the office could be bad for computer security
New School of Management research explores ‘technological entitlement,’ a feeling some employees have that they are more deserving of high-tech resources, uses and privileges than their co-workers. Through three studies with independent samples totaling nearly 700 working adults, their findings show these employees pose a direct threat to the information security of organizations.

 

George Chamoun rings the bell at the Nasdaq stock exchange to celebrate ACV’s IPO.

Setting the stage

Setting the stage
School of Management alumni launch and lead pioneering companies around the globe. But more than that, these innovators are making an impact on the entrepreneurial scene wherever they are—paving the way for others, too.

 

Doctor at laptop videoconferencing with a patient.

Bringing telemedicine to sleep apnea patients

Bringing telemedicine to sleep apnea patients
Sleep apnea is an underdiagnosed and undertreated condition, but as awareness and demand for care increase, School of Management researchers have helped create a new set of digital tools to serve the growing number of patients.

 

Sonya A. Tareke and Malkijah Griffiths of Team Real Talk celebrate winning the 2022 Panasci competition.

DEI startup wins Panasci competition

DEI startup wins Panasci competition
Team Real Talk, a certified B Corporation founded by an MPH/MBA student and two School of Management alumni, took first place and $65K in startup funding and services at this year's Panasci Technology Entrepreneurship Competition. Their Real Talk platform gives the online community access to curated information and provides inclusive topics of conversation that relate to many cultures, backgrounds and career fields.

 

Merritt in Alfiero Center.

Practice makes perfect

Practice makes perfect
Think back to your first professional job interview. How did you feel walking in? Our Career Resource Center's Practice Interview Program prepares School of Management students to shine by practicing interview skills, identifying areas of improvement and building confidence.

 

Female leader presenting at a meeting.

Communications skills predict team leaders

Communication skills predict who emerge as team leaders at work
If you want to be seen as a leader, work on your public speaking skills — that’s the takeaway from a new School of Management study, which found strong communication skills reliably predict leadership emergence in teams.

 

Person holding briefcase and mask.

The new, new normal

The new, new normal
After the COVID-19 pandemic forced much of the world's workforce to go remote, a disconnect has developed between many leaders who want to get back to "the way it was" as soon as possible and workers who wish to continue working remotely. Our leadership experts weigh in with their vision of the future of work. 

 

Scanning old newspapers.

Data mining the past

Data mining the past
By analyzing more than 14,000 newspaper articles from the late 1800s, one School of Management researcher has co-developed a new algorithm that searches historic documents to discover noteworthy people.

 

Mall shopping during the holidays.

A bright retail season

A bright retail season
This holiday season should be strong in terms of spending and consumer confidence, according to Charles Lindsey, an expert in retail marketing strategy, brands and consumer behavior. He expects that combined in-store and online revenues will be nearly 10% higher relative to last year.

 

Shipping containers at a port of entry.

A “supply chain bomb”

A “supply chain bomb”
This holiday season, School of Management experts say to expect shortages of gift items like toys, clothes and appliances, as well as delays in order fulfillment—all caused by global supply chains disruptions.

Ronald Aucapina and his family at commencement.

The first, but not the last

The first, but not the last
First-generation students demonstrate the life-changing value of education.

Marijuana plants.

Growing like a weed

Growing like a weed
As more states unwind their restrictions on cannabis, businesses find opportunities and challenges in an emerging industry.

Professor Tu demonstrates the power pose: feet shoulder-width apart, hands on hips, chest out and chin up.

Attractiveness pays off at work—but there’s a trick to level the playing field

Attractiveness pays off at work—but there’s a trick to level the playing field
While a “beauty premium” exists across professions, a new School of Management study analyzed 300 elevator pitches and discovered that less attractive job candidates can level the playing field by adopting a more powerful posture. 

Dean Paul Tesluk takes a selfie with the LeaderCORE Class of 2021 at their graduation ceremony.

Reflecting, learning, growing: 10 years of LeaderCORE™

Reflecting, learning, growing
On the 10th anniversary of LeaderCORE™, its graduates are making an impact.  

The Constellation Brands massive brewery in Nava, Mexico.

Taking control in a real-world audit

Taking control in a real-world audit
In their internal auditing course, MS Accounting students become consultants for major companies and small businesses. 

Man sits away from his colleagues.

When workers feel powerless, they get paranoid—and aggressive

When workers feel powerless, they get paranoid—and aggressive
When employees lack power at work, they can feel vulnerable and paranoid. In turn, that paranoia can cause people to lash out against colleagues or family members and even seek to undermine their organization’s success, according to new School of Management research.

Graduates of the LeaderCORE class of 2021.

Using feedback to grow

Using feedback to grow
Receiving and acting upon feedback is critical to personal development and team success. Jaimie Falzarano, LeaderCORE managing director, shares how to effectively use feedback to grow—whether you’re on the soccer field or in the C-suite.

Milad Ghanatios stands outside a building on the UB North Campus.

The Gold Standard

The gold standard
Milad Ghanatios, a first-generation student from Rochester, is the eighth School of Management student since 2012 to earn a prestigious assistantship at the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) or its counterpart for state and local governments, the Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB). All past FASB and GASB assistants from UB have gone on to careers at Big Four firms and other major companies.

Zay Ya Min Yin stands in a hallway outside the Lockwood Library on UB's North Campus.

A place to call home

A place to call home
Zay Ya Min Yin grew up in Papua New Guinea, moved to Myanmar as a teenager and began his college career in Singapore. So when he decided to pursue a college degree in the U.S., he wanted to find a place he could call home.

Business person selects rating for a doctor.

The problem with doctor rating websites

The problem with doctor rating websites
Researchers found that users don't trust the accuracy of data on websites where patients rate and review physicians. And for good reason—the study revealed a glaring lack of negative ratings, and that doctors even have options to hide negative comments. 

Moser holding a Comcast internship graduation cap.

From a food truck to a Fortune 30

From a food truck to a Fortune 30
Just two years after graduating high school, Samantha Moser, BS ’21, is on the verge of her dream job at Fortune 30 company. Her success is the result of hard work through a series of opportunities in the UB School of Management that took her from a food truck worker to a finance professional at a telecommunications giant. 

Donate button on a keyboard.

When devising a fundraising strategy, listen to your donors—not the experts

When devising a fundraising strategy, listen to your donors—not the experts
Attention nonprofit professionals: When you consider fundraising ideas, new School of Management research shows you shouldn’t rely on, well, academic research, or industry experts either.

American flags with money falling from the sky.

Federal government backs the most promising startups

Federal government backs the most promising startups
A new study from the School of Management analyzed firms that received Small Business Innovation Research grants and found the federal government can effectively implement entrepreneurial programs and select the kind of ventures that make a big impact.

Businessman standing outside in a city holding a box.

How a company’s consistent earnings can get a CEO fired

How a company’s consistent earnings can get a CEO fired
UB School of Management researchers analyzed 24 years of data and find that when a corporation’s earnings are steady, its board of directors is more likely to fire their CEO after a bad earnings period.

Diana Donnarumma at Baird Point on UB's North Campus.

Resilience in life and business

Resilience in life and business
As an entrepreneur, Diana Donnarumma intimately understands the needs of her customers—individuals who live with chronic illness. That’s because she has spent the better part of the past six years in and out of hospitals, undergoing procedure after procedure.

Anubha Singh at the Innovation Center on the Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus.

From students to 'ninja consultants'

From students to 'ninja consultants'
In an experiential learning course, MIS students solve real-world challenges using new technology.

UB School of Management student Michael Nejame holds Millie the dog.

Declaring independence

Declaring independence
As the gig economy goes mainstream, an increasing percentage of the working-age population now engages in some form of independent work. It’s a shift that has evolved with technology but is still experiencing growing pains—for workers and the companies that enable gig jobs.