We’re changing the world of business

The University at Buffalo School of Management is a vibrant and inclusive community of big thinkers and even bigger doers. We work together to question and upend theories, lifting each other up and driving change. Because at the UB School of Management, ambition is a virtue, tenacity is a given, and discovery happens everywhere, from the classroom to the boardroom. That’s just how we do it here.

Dean Paul Tesluk takes a selfie with the LeaderCORE Class of 2021 at their graduation ceremony.

Reflecting, learning, growing: 10 years of LeaderCORE™

Reflecting, learning, growing
On the 10th anniversary of LeaderCORE™, its graduates are making an impact.  

The Constellation Brands massive brewery in Nava, Mexico.

Taking control in a real-world audit

Taking control in a real-world audit
In their internal auditing course, MS Accounting students become consultants for major companies and small businesses. 

Man sits away from his colleagues.

When workers feel powerless, they get paranoid—and aggressive

When workers feel powerless, they get paranoid—and aggressive
When employees lack power at work, they can feel vulnerable and paranoid. In turn, that paranoia can cause people to lash out against colleagues or family members and even seek to undermine their organization’s success, according to new School of Management research.

Graduates of the LeaderCORE class of 2021.

Using feedback to grow

Using feedback to grow
Receiving and acting upon feedback is critical to personal development and team success. Jaimie Falzarano, LeaderCORE managing director, shares how to effectively use feedback to grow—whether you’re on the soccer field or in the C-suite.

Milad Ghanatios stands outside a building on the UB North Campus.

The Gold Standard

The gold standard
Milad Ghanatios, a first-generation student from Rochester, is the eighth School of Management student since 2012 to earn a prestigious assistantship at the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) or its counterpart for state and local governments, the Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB). All past FASB and GASB assistants from UB have gone on to careers at Big Four firms and other major companies.

Zay Ya Min Yin stands in a hallway outside the Lockwood Library on UB's North Campus.

A place to call home

A place to call home
Zay Ya Min Yin grew up in Papua New Guinea, moved to Myanmar as a teenager and began his college career in Singapore. So when he decided to pursue a college degree in the U.S., he wanted to find a place he could call home.

Business person selects rating for a doctor.

The problem with doctor rating websites

The problem with doctor rating websites
Researchers found that users don't trust the accuracy of data on websites where patients rate and review physicians. And for good reason—the study revealed a glaring lack of negative ratings, and that doctors even have options to hide negative comments. 

Moser holding a Comcast internship graduation cap.

From a food truck to a Fortune 30

From a food truck to a Fortune 30
Just two years after graduating high school, Samantha Moser, BS ’21, is on the verge of her dream job at Fortune 30 company. Her success is the result of hard work through a series of opportunities in the UB School of Management that took her from a freshman food truck worker to a finance professional at a telecommunications giant. 

Donate button on a keyboard.

When devising a fundraising strategy, listen to your donors—not the experts

When devising a fundraising strategy, listen to your donors—not the experts
Attention nonprofit professionals: When you consider fundraising ideas, new School of Management research shows you shouldn’t rely on, well, academic research, or industry experts either.

American flags with money falling from the sky.

Federal government backs the most promising startups

Federal government backs the most promising startups
A new study from the School of Management analyzed firms that received Small Business Innovation Research grants and found the federal government can effectively implement entrepreneurial programs and select the kind of ventures that make a big impact.

Businessman standing outside in a city holding a box.

How a company’s consistent earnings can get a CEO fired

How a company’s consistent earnings can get a CEO fired
UB School of Management researchers analyzed 24 years of data and find that when a corporation’s earnings are steady, its board of directors is more likely to fire their CEO after a bad earnings period.

Diana Donnarumma at Baird Point on UB's North Campus.

Resilience in life and business

Resilience in life and business
As an entrepreneur, Diana Donnarumma intimately understands the needs of her customers—individuals who live with chronic illness. That’s because she has spent the better part of the past six years in and out of hospitals, undergoing procedure after procedure.

Anubha Singh at the Innovation Center on the Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus.

From students to 'ninja consultants'

From students to 'ninja consultants'
In an experiential learning course, MIS students solve real-world challenges using new technology.

UB School of Management student Michael Nejame holds Millie the dog.

Declaring independence

Declaring independence
As the gig economy goes mainstream, an increasing percentage of the working-age population now engages in some form of independent work. It’s a shift that has evolved with technology but is still experiencing growing pains—for workers and the companies that enable gig jobs.

MS Finance students Fernando Lemonje Westrupp, Turya Vardhan, Roshit Badjatiya and Guodong Huang inside the magnificent Shea's Performing Arts Center.

Going above and beyond

Going above and beyond
Working in teams, Finance Academy students use their analytical skills to consult on projects with local organizations, providing them a chance to collaborate with business executives, gain real-world experience and make an impact in the community—even during a pandemic.

$100 bill with Benjamin Franklin wearing a coronavirus mask.

How coronavirus bailouts should be structured

How coronavirus bailouts should be structured
The government should acquire stakes in firms—not just hand out loans, according to a UB School of Management expert.

Shadowy person sitting in front of a laptop computer.

Inside the mind of a hacker

Inside the mind of a hacker
Whether cracking digital security for good or ill, new research finds that hackers tend to be people who are manipulative, deceitful, exploitative, cynical and insensitive.

Woman leading a group discussion at the office.

Women have advantage in servant leadership

Women have advantage in servant leadership
Servant leadership is good for business—and new research shows that women are better at it.

Shannon Lach, Xingyu Chen and Kristie Bailey at Stitch Buffalo, a nonprofit that empowers refugee women through textile arts.

Strengthening the fabric of our community

Strengthening the fabric of our community
In UB’s Social Impact Fellows program, interdisciplinary student teams combine their strengths to develop innovative solutions to social issues at mission-driven organizations across Western New York.  

Robots sitting at computers in a call center.

AI and self-employment

AI and self-employment
Some of the lowest paid and most popular jobs are at the greatest risk of being displaced by AI, according to new research from Kate Bezrukova, associate professor of organization and human resources.

Main Street in a small town.

Hometown advantage?

Hometown advantage?
Multinational conglomerate Berkshire Hathaway buys CEO Warren Buffett’s struggling hometown newspaper. Amazon acquires Whole Foods, which is headquartered in the same state where CEO Jeff Bezos grew up and owns a home. New UB School of Management research shows these deals aren’t coincidences.

Students standing outside a Google building in Silicon Valley.

Tech trek

Tech trek
On a visit to Silicon Valley, UB School of Management students got an inside look at large tech companies, emerging startups and prominent venture capital firms—directly from founders and executive leadership.

Illustration of two business people pushing together arrows.

Acquiring innovation

Acquiring innovation
New research shows businesses that focus on innovation are more likely to be acquired—and command a higher price when they are.

Illustration of a man with a devil shadow behind him and an angel shadow ahead.

The curious case of business ethics

The curious case of business ethics
What is ethical at work? Professor Jim Lemoine digs into why nobody can quite agree.

Briana Tom at Harper International Corp.

Better with Business

Better with business
How alumni boosted career success by complementing their passion with an MBA.

New York City skyline.

Empire state of mind

Empire state of mind
For two decades, dedicated School of Management alumni have connected with talented students in the heart of New York City to help them prepare for careers in the Big Apple.

Tamara Lewis-Cunningham, MWEE ’07, Zandra Cunningham, MWEE ’14 and Zandra Lewis, MWEE ’07, in the showroom of their Pierce Arrow Commerce Park production facility.

Living the dream

Living the dream
Three generations of entrepreneurs took their business from mom's kitchen to the shelves of Target.

Three women sitting.

Jump in

Jump in
Through professional development sessions, volunteer projects and social events, UB’s Women in Management club provides students with opportunities to build their network and prepare for success in the corporate world.